WSJ: Early detection of breast cancer backed by U.K. study

This article can be found at wsj.com By MELINDA BECK Dec. 4, 2015  Detecting and treating an early form of breast cancer lowers the number of invasive breast cancers found over the next three years, according to a study of 5.2 million U.K. women. The study, published on Friday in the journal Lancet Oncology, provides reassurance that early cancer detection is beneficial amid growing concern that it also leads to unnecessary treatment, the researchers said. Ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, involves clusters of abnormal cells confined to the milk ducts of the breast. It was seldom seen before mammograms came into widespread use in the 1980s but now accounts for nearly one-quarter of all breast cancers detected by screening—some 60,000 cases a year in the U.S. Some experts argue that DCIS shouldn’t be labeled cancer at all, since it’s unclear whether it will spread outside the milk ducts. Yet virtually all DCIS cases are treated as if they were cancer, with lumpectomies, with or without radiation, or mastectomies. Since DCIS is seldom left untreated, there is little data on how many cases would become invasive cancers, although some estimates suggest that as few as 20% progress. In the latest study, researchers at Queen Mary University of London analyzed records of 5.2 million women ages 50 to 64 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland who had mammograms between 2003 and 2007. In 90% of the local screening areas, for every three cases of DCIS detected and treated, one fewer case of invasive cancer was diagnosed in the following three years than would have been without early intervention, the study found....

“Our Community, Your Choice” returns Four non-profit nominees vie to win $2,000 in cash prizes

Breast Diagnostic Center has opened the “Our Community, Your Choice” polls once again for area non-profits. The company will award two winners a first and second place cash prize. “Our Community, Your Choice,” a people’s choice contest, is brought to Federal Way, Auburn and surrounding communities by the independent mammography clinic Breast Diagnostic Center. The company believes the best way to positively impact our communities is by supporting the non-profits that serve the area. “Our Community, Your Choice” is designed to give the power to choose the winning organizations to Breast Diagnostic patients and the community at large.   Breast Diagnostic staff members nominated four local non-profits for the contest. Nominees include 2014 winners Angel Wings Foundation and the Auburn Food Bank, as well as newcomers FUSION – Friends United to Shelter the Indigent, Oppressed and Needy and Communities in Schools of Federal Way. Staff have always sought to choose organizations that directly impact the communities Breast Diagnostic serves. This year’s nominees positively impact the lives of kids, adults and families in their respective neighborhoods, making a difference on a hyper local level. The first place winner will receive $1,500 and second place will be awarded $500.   Communities in Schools of Federal Way is focused on dropout prevention, in line with the national CIS organization’s mission. Students from the Federal Way School District are surrounded by a community of support both inside and outside of the classroom, through a network of CIS affiliates, site coordinators and collaborative partners. In 2014, CIS Federal Way assisted 8,350 students, making a major impact on the community. To learn more about CIS...

Dr. Ulissey via Auburn Reporter: Don’t wait, skip years; annual mammograms still save lives

As most of you may already know, a few weeks ago the American Cancer Society (ACS) modified its guidelines for breast cancer screening – adding discord and uncertainty, initially started by the U.S. Preventive Services Task force (USPSTF). Instead of recommending mammograms on women from age 40 onward, it pushed the start age to 45, causing virtually every specialist in breast imaging and breast cancer to wonder why. The nuts and bolts of what the ACS said are: women should begin to have mammograms at age 45 and get them yearly to age 55, then skip years, but they should have the ability to get mammograms beginning at age 40 on a yearly basis if they want to. How wishy-washy is that? Read More  Join the Conversation     facebook...

A tribute to Lynne, a breast cancer survivor by Trang Mai

I cannot stress enough the importance of getting your mammogram done annually.  I had skipped four years in a row.  As a result, I had quite a scare when I finally made time for a mammogram during the summer of 2014.   Thankfully, I met a brilliant breast cancer researcher, professor, and radiologist, Dr. Michael Ulissey, for a second opinion.  He explained that it was too drastic to remove a golf ball sized tissue before confirming that I in fact tested positive for cancer.  He performed a 2nd biopsy to take out only the dime-sized radial scar tissue for thorough testing.  Exactly a year ago, I was beyond relieved to receive a call from Dr. Ulissey informing me that I tested cancer-free!  Read more on Trang’s...

Video: Dr. Ulissey disagrees with ACS breast cancer screening guidelines

On October 20, 2015 the American Cancer Society released a new set of breast cancer screening guidelines. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, these guidelines now recommend women begin mammography at age 45 instead of 40. “When one reads the fine print, though, the ACS article states mammograms should be available to women between the ages of 40 and 45 if they want one.  I don’t see why they don’t make a strong statement one way or the other and state why they do so.  It seems to me they are unwilling to stand tall and make a call – they seem to vacillate on the issue, alternatively suggest looking at a woman’s particular risk factors, and seem to forget that 75 percent of women who get breast cancer have no identifiable risk factors, so to me, that statement makes no sense,” says Dr. Ulissey KOMO, an ABC affiliate in Seattle, interviewed Breast Diagnostic Center’s Dr. Mike Ulissey regarding the guidelines.  Dr. Ulissey is a Fellow of the American College of Radiology and is known internationally as a leader in breast imaging.  He is in direct disagreement with the ACS guidelines and believes women should begin annual screening mammograms at 40.  “There is a plethora of scientific evidence that shows women should begin screening at age 40 and continue as long as they are healthy,” he is quoted as saying. See the KOMO video and chime in. To learn more about Dr. Ulissey read his bio. facebook...

Dr. Ulissey October Reporter: Majority of physicians urge regular mammograms

Q. I was chatting with a patient about the American Cancer Society guidelines on yearly screening mammography and she asked me if doctors practice what they preach. A. In the case of mammograms and early detection, the answer was an overwhelming “yes.” Answering that exact question, a research article was published last June in one of the most respected Radiology journals, “American Journal of Roentgenology.” The researchers found over 98 percent of physicians who specialize in mammography recommend the test on a yearly basis to friends, family and patients. The statistics held up regardless of whether the doctor was male or female. Female physicians 40 and older who specialize in mammography get their checkup yearly and both genders recommend yearly checkups to their patients, family members and friends. As I reflect on why this is, I think it is because we, as doctors who specialize in early detection, see how well our patients do when we identify a small cancer and make it a manageable detour in her life, versus when we care for a patient who has not had regular checkups and now is faced with a poor outcome from a larger cancer that could have been caught earlier. I think dealing with those scenarios on a daily basis drives physicians to practice what we preach. Read More on Auburn Reporter Online  Learn more about Dr....